The Golden Era of Chicago Movie Theatres

bk5Two great families buried in the Jewish Waldheim Cemetery at Forest Park changed Chicago entertainment forever.

maxwellIsrael Balaban (1862-1931) a Jewish immigrant arrived in Chicago in 1882 from Odessa Russia along with his wife Augusta “Goldie” Manderbursky (1868-1936). They opened a grocery store and fish shop on Chicago’s famous Maxwell Street. They and their five sons and  daughter lived in the back of the store.

 

By 1910 the family had moved to the west side where two of their five sons,  Barney Balaban (1887-1971) the oldest son,  and A. J. Balaban (1889-1962) along  with partners Sam Katz (1892-1961) and Sam’s father Morris Katz (1869 -1939)  became the genius behind the Balaban and Katz chain of palatial “movie palaces “.  These wonderful theatres shaped how almost every one of us and our parents sought entertainment and viewed the Hollywood movies. Continue reading “The Golden Era of Chicago Movie Theatres”

Meet Rev. Gotthilf J. Lambrecht

Preaching after death

 

preacher

Anyone visiting Montrose Cemetery at 5400 N Pulaski Avenue in Chicago will certainly pass by the most imposing grave of the Reverend Gotthilf J. Lambrecht. Every day, since his death, he appears to continue to steadfastly preach from his granite pulpit, as he did in life. .  His family members are buried in rows in front of the monument much like they would be sitting in front of a pulpit in church, as if listening to his sermon. Continue reading “Meet Rev. Gotthilf J. Lambrecht”