Philip Maxwell, Someone for you to Meet

phillip maxwell portraitHis name was Philip Garrison Maxwell,  born April 3 1799 in Guilford Vermont. He became a physician for the United States Army and was assigned to Fort Dearborn, Chicago, Illinois as an Assistant Surgeon.   From 1844 to 1847, he ran a doctor’s office at the corner of Lake and Clark Streets. But more  about him later.  The famous Chicago Maxwell Street, was named after him.
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Celebrating the Corner Drug Store

Seems like there was a drugstore in every neighborhood and one or two within easy walking distance of home.

Let me introduce you to Edwin John Sanders,  one of those kindly people that everyone should have had the privilege to know. Edwin was born  March 14, 1882 in Hastings, Adams County, Nebraska, USA,  the son of Adeline Tessier and Herman Sanders. In 1901 he graduated from the Iowa Pharmacy School, Highland Park College inDes Moines, then the Chicago College of Pharmacy at the University of Illinois at Chicago in 1904. Continue reading “Celebrating the Corner Drug Store”

Lauren’s Gimmicks

3dYou might not recall his first few gadgets, the spring driven clock that kept better time, three-dimensional glasses,  or an automatic bridge table card shuffler.  During the World War II, he helped develop a remote control of missiles, infrared sensors to guide bombs and a new type of gyroscope.

His story gets way better so please read on! Continue reading “Lauren’s Gimmicks”

He died at the keyboard!

For those who have read my blog  “THE EXPLODING ACCORDION” at https://chicagoandcookcountycemeteries.com/2018/12/05/the-exploding-accordion/ this is somewhat of a humorous sequel. The Exploding Accordion was the story of my Uncle Jack Erschen, (stage name Jack Rich) who carved out a ten year career on vaudeville stages across the country. Later, in life he became a professional Hammond organist in Illinois clubs and restaurants. Even if you have not yet read his story, read on…

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