Ten Cemeteries and Wrigley Field

Join me on a virtual tour of Chicago’s Northside cemetery corridor. It will help you to understand the growth of burial places along Clark Street,  a north-south street and one of the oldest roads in the city. It runs parallel to and not far from the shore of Lake Michigan, extending north into Evanston Illinois where it becomes Chicago Avenue.clark map Continue reading “Ten Cemeteries and Wrigley Field”

Hoosier Grove Immanuel Cemetery – Early hardworking farming families

chAs much as I would like to concentrate on the larger and popular cemeteries in the Chicago area, there are so many wonderful and smaller burial grounds within Chicago and Cook county that deserve to be celebrated. Some are the cemeteries of our early settlers, who worked hard to farm the land and milk the cows, go to church, and quietly raise family. These cemeteries may not have unusual or headline grabbing stories, but they are so important to the fabric of our local history.  So this blog describes the quiet Immanuel United Church Cemetery better known back in the day as Hoosier’s Grove Immanuel Cemetery, now within Streamwood.stone imm bartlett Continue reading “Hoosier Grove Immanuel Cemetery – Early hardworking farming families”

Leaving a stone at a gravesite

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The Jewish  faith, as well as some others, have a wonderful and thoughtful custom of leaving a small stone on the grave.  Placing a stone on the grave is an act of remembrance and serves as a sign to others that someone has visited the grave. It also enables visitors to honor the burial and the deceased.

Why stones you ask?  Stones are lasting and fitting symbols of the lasting presence of the deceased’s life and memory. Why not Flowers?   Flowers are a good metaphor for life. Life withers; it fades like a flower. For that reason, flowers are an apt symbol of passing, but while flowers may be a good metaphor for the brevity of life, stones seem better suited to the permanence of memory. Stones do not die. Continue reading “Leaving a stone at a gravesite”

An Elevator in a Cemetery!

205benhOne of the most unusual buildings in a Chicago area cemetery is one that consists of  just an elevator. It is a beautiful structure with stained glass windows and could easily be thought of as a small chapel.  The questions most often asked are where and why. Continue reading “An Elevator in a Cemetery!”

Funeral Streetcars

Funeral streetcars were found in major cities including Chicago, San Francisco, Detroit, Los Angeles, and others.  The Metropolitan Chicago transit system built two streetcars in 1910 built specifically for funeral service, each having drapes on the windows and a special compartment for the casket. Continue reading “Funeral Streetcars”

Meet Rev. Gotthilf J. Lambrecht

Preaching after death

 

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Anyone visiting Montrose Cemetery at 5400 N Pulaski Avenue in Chicago will certainly pass by the most imposing grave of the Reverend Gotthilf J. Lambrecht. Every day, since his death, he appears to continue to steadfastly preach from his granite pulpit, as he did in life. .  His family members are buried in rows in front of the monument much like they would be sitting in front of a pulpit in church, as if listening to his sermon. Continue reading “Meet Rev. Gotthilf J. Lambrecht”